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Posts from the ‘CamAWiSE events’ Category

Our Anniversary – make it your event

It’s just eight weeks now until our 20th Anniversary celebrations on October 2nd. This will be a fantastic opportunity for women in STEM to network with others, find out how things have changed for women in the last 20 years, and have their say about the challenges that remain.

If you haven’t yet booked your place, please do so soon, as places are limited. Please register here by 18th September. The event is open to both non-members and members of CAMAWiSE. No matter what stage you have reached in your career, what your background is, or which area of STEM you work in, you will be very welcome, and will be able to take home something valuable from the meeting. We will certainly encourage and listen to your input, too.

There are many CAMAWiSE members who we never see at our events. If this sounds like you, why not take this opportunity to come along and meet us? If our events don’t appeal to you, then we’d like to know what kind of events we can organise which will entice you along – this is your chance to let us know.

As part of our anniversary celebrations, we are running a survey to find out about the issues currently affecting women working in STEM. Read more

What next after Academia? Tania Montanari reports on an inspiring event at the MRC-LMB

LMB Speakers picThere may be many paths to choose on the way out from an academic research lab. You hang your lab-coat, and bring with you your PhD degree, your post doc experience and a wealth of transferable skills and a new adventure starts! On June 4th, three brilliant women shared their career path and the urges that guided their decisions with a very engaged audience at the prestigious MRC-LMB.

Dr Sobia Raza introduced the audience to the exciting world of science policy. In political institutions scientists are largely under-represented but their role is fundamental in the application of scientific knowledge in the political process and in the development of policies to support science. The final aim of pursuing a science policy career is to contribute to finding effective ways for science to benefit society.

Sobia had very clear ideas about her career which was carefully planned: during her PhD in Edinburgh, she applied for a science policy placement and seconded to the Scottish Parliament as a Research Specialist. She put great efforts in searching opportunities to grab for enriching her CV with relevant experiences while carrying on with her scientific career as a post doc researcher at the Roslin Institute.

Finding the right opportunities to prepare for pursuing a career in science policy is very demanding in terms of both time and energy as they are not properly advertised. Read more

“You don’t need to be artistic to be creative…”

event3-mediumIt’s 2:53am and that “Let It Go” song from Disney’s Frozen™ is running around my head, to accompany the sound of my youngest waking up, coughing and crying for the third time tonight. Perhaps the reason for this choice of earworm could be literal – I’m really quite cold now having got out of bed so many times – but more on that later.

Having missed so many of the great talks and workshops recently, I was excited to be attending Unleash Your Creativity, our April networking evening at Lucy Cavendish this week. Our very own Tennie Videler is used to providing training from her Vitae days so she launched in with her usual flair … and even a little ballet hop.

Tennie started off asking the room what we thought being creative was, and pounced on the suggestion that it was all about being artistic, and the counter that it was about thinking outside of the box. No, she said, artistic certainly helps but you don’t need to be artistic to be creative. She also asked us to indicate who had attended (a) because we thought we were creative, or (b) because we thought we weren’t – and then went on to say some people were “adaptive” (climbing ladders) and others were “creative” (haring up rock faces). Creative people take risks but “have a splendid time doing it”.

Ideally we could be both types of people, but the trick is to recognise which is your dominant character, then find others to work with who are the opposite of you.   We went through some exercises based on the ENTRE (ENquire, Transform, REalise) model which seems a great (oddly rigid but effective) way to zoom out/go wide with ideas, then bring you back into focus, go wide-focus, then narrow again. Three times apparently is the recommended cycle.   First we spent some time reframing Tennie’s question “How could AWiSE get more members?” which had our little group going round in circles with whats, whos, wheres, whens, whys and hows. Interestingly, while our final questions were worded differently, we were asking the same thing, eventually.

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“And what do you do?”

These are the words which I most dread hearing, at any gathering, be it social or business. Why? Because I’m convinced before I utter a single word in response that I’m boring the pants off the person who asked the question. Because I can anticipate their eyes glazing over before I start. And, crucially, because I’m no longer passionate about what I do for a living. As we discovered at our Winter Networking event, being passionate about what you do, and being able to describe why you love it, is key to ensuring the other person remembers what you’ve told them.

Adelina Chalmers

Adelina Chalmers

Who better to invite to our networking event than Adelina Chalmers, CEO and founder of Presenting Good Practice? Adelina is most certainly passionate about what she does; Read more

Sue Black: making change happen

On November 14th,  a good crowd of AWiSE and Lucy Cavendish members were entertained by Sue Black talking about her life and many achievements.  She is a wonderful example of how you can bring about change, not just in your own life, but for the benefit of others too.

Finding herself a single mum with three under-fives living in Tower Hamlets, she decided that she needed to get a qualification to provide an income for her family.  She started by doing a Maths access course where she was one of only two women, who came joint top of the class.  She followed this with a computing degree at the University of the South Bank – chosen as the nearest place to home so she could juggle childcare.  When she was asked to continue to PhD level, she admits she did not know what a PhD was.  She then followed an academic career in computing, becoming Head of Information and Software Systems at the University of Westminster.

Sue’s first step into making a difference was to set up BCSWomen, which she did to provide a forum for women in IT, who were often the only women in their department or at a conference, to interact and support each other.  On a visit to Bletchley Park, Sue was surprised to learn that over half of the war-time staff had been women.  So she started an oral history project to tell their story. Read more

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