Skip to content

Posts from the ‘CamAWiSE events’ Category

The new AWiSE season – confidence, communication, better presentations and so much more!

Another successful season of CAMAWiSE events is complete. But we don’t look back for long, we’re well into planning our calendar of events for 2015-16. We do hope you can join us for one or more of them!

 

Nina Cooke

Nina Cooke

The autumn term sees parts three and four of our WiSE UP 2015 series of worshops, for which booking is already open. We have Nina Cooke, Confidence Coach, helping us to learn how to ‘Thrive at work: discover how to feel confident and valued’, on September 15th. This is followed on October 13th by Jane Goodall’s Communication Skills Masterclass. Read more and book here.

We are delighted to be presenting a joint event with the East Anglian branch of the Institute of Physics, on October 1st. The distinctive Schlumberger Gould Research Centre, in West Cambridge, will be our host for this event, featuring a talk by Dr Sarah Bohndiek, WISE Research Award winner. Read more

Meetings – a survival guide

Meetings.

We have all, at some time, endured them, led them, organised them, maybe even enjoyed them! Everyone probably has their own idea of how they should be run and what they should be for. And at our recent event, I think we must have heard just about every possible point of view on bad practice in meetings and how to deal with it.

As an icebreaker, our ‘Meetings bingo’ worked well. We each had a list of meeting ‘roles’, such as ‘asked for a pay rise’, ‘interviewed someone’, ‘introduced a speaker’, and the challenge was to talk to different people and discover examples of what might have gone wrong for them in each of these situations. AWiSE members rarely need much excuse to get chatting but this exercise certainly helped!

20150714_211514As a group, we discussed some of the issues arising from these conversations. An amazing array of experiences was revealed, along with some equally interesting and creative suggestions for dealing with some of the awkward and difficult situations being described. Read more

Our Anniversary – make it your event

It’s just eight weeks now until our 20th Anniversary celebrations on October 2nd. This will be a fantastic opportunity for women in STEM to network with others, find out how things have changed for women in the last 20 years, and have their say about the challenges that remain.

If you haven’t yet booked your place, please do so soon, as places are limited. Please register here by 18th September. The event is open to both non-members and members of CAMAWiSE. No matter what stage you have reached in your career, what your background is, or which area of STEM you work in, you will be very welcome, and will be able to take home something valuable from the meeting. We will certainly encourage and listen to your input, too.

There are many CAMAWiSE members who we never see at our events. If this sounds like you, why not take this opportunity to come along and meet us? If our events don’t appeal to you, then we’d like to know what kind of events we can organise which will entice you along – this is your chance to let us know.

As part of our anniversary celebrations, we are running a survey to find out about the issues currently affecting women working in STEM. Read more

What next after Academia? Tania Montanari reports on an inspiring event at the MRC-LMB

LMB Speakers picThere may be many paths to choose on the way out from an academic research lab. You hang your lab-coat, and bring with you your PhD degree, your post doc experience and a wealth of transferable skills and a new adventure starts! On June 4th, three brilliant women shared their career path and the urges that guided their decisions with a very engaged audience at the prestigious MRC-LMB.

Dr Sobia Raza introduced the audience to the exciting world of science policy. In political institutions scientists are largely under-represented but their role is fundamental in the application of scientific knowledge in the political process and in the development of policies to support science. The final aim of pursuing a science policy career is to contribute to finding effective ways for science to benefit society.

Sobia had very clear ideas about her career which was carefully planned: during her PhD in Edinburgh, she applied for a science policy placement and seconded to the Scottish Parliament as a Research Specialist. She put great efforts in searching opportunities to grab for enriching her CV with relevant experiences while carrying on with her scientific career as a post doc researcher at the Roslin Institute.

Finding the right opportunities to prepare for pursuing a career in science policy is very demanding in terms of both time and energy as they are not properly advertised. Read more

“You don’t need to be artistic to be creative…”

event3-mediumIt’s 2:53am and that “Let It Go” song from Disney’s Frozen™ is running around my head, to accompany the sound of my youngest waking up, coughing and crying for the third time tonight. Perhaps the reason for this choice of earworm could be literal – I’m really quite cold now having got out of bed so many times – but more on that later.

Having missed so many of the great talks and workshops recently, I was excited to be attending Unleash Your Creativity, our April networking evening at Lucy Cavendish this week. Our very own Tennie Videler is used to providing training from her Vitae days so she launched in with her usual flair … and even a little ballet hop.

Tennie started off asking the room what we thought being creative was, and pounced on the suggestion that it was all about being artistic, and the counter that it was about thinking outside of the box. No, she said, artistic certainly helps but you don’t need to be artistic to be creative. She also asked us to indicate who had attended (a) because we thought we were creative, or (b) because we thought we weren’t – and then went on to say some people were “adaptive” (climbing ladders) and others were “creative” (haring up rock faces). Creative people take risks but “have a splendid time doing it”.

Ideally we could be both types of people, but the trick is to recognise which is your dominant character, then find others to work with who are the opposite of you.   We went through some exercises based on the ENTRE (ENquire, Transform, REalise) model which seems a great (oddly rigid but effective) way to zoom out/go wide with ideas, then bring you back into focus, go wide-focus, then narrow again. Three times apparently is the recommended cycle.   First we spent some time reframing Tennie’s question “How could AWiSE get more members?” which had our little group going round in circles with whats, whos, wheres, whens, whys and hows. Interestingly, while our final questions were worded differently, we were asking the same thing, eventually.

Read more

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 95 other followers

%d bloggers like this: