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Posts tagged ‘CamAWiSE’

Meet the Steering Group – Ruchi Chauhan

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I am a biotechnology scientist with 15 years of research experience in various fields, including Neuroscience, Cancer, Proteo-Gen(omics) etc. I did my Ph.D. research at the Boston Children’s Hospital / Harvard Medical School, USA. I worked as a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Merck Pharma, Boston, USA. Currently, I am a Research Scientist at the Department of Genetics at the University of Cambridge.

Developing the business potential of scientific innovations has been my passion. I have often led my research projects to reach their applied or therapeutic potential and to be used as a tool of innovation and commercialization for better productivity. In addition, I have worked as the Fellow of Commercialization at the Technology Transfer department of the Harvard University. I have co-founded a data-analysis company that is in early proof-of-concept phase.

I am serving in various leadership & management roles in esteemed STEM organizations engaging students, women professionals, and non-scientific public. To name a few, I am a STEM Ambassador (STEMNET), Deputy-Chair (CamAWiSE), Mentor (NYAS), Science Reviewer (AAAS), and in Communications team (Pint of Science). I am an active educator/communicator of science contributing to STEM education/outreach, especially for women.

Book now! Moving from Diversity to inclusion with Dawn Bonfield, MBE.

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“The HeART of Mentoring” with Natacha Wilson – by Shivi Chandna

“Mentoring is to support and encourage people to manage their own learning in order that they may maximise their potential, develop their skills, improve their performance and become the person they want to be.”

 The Oxford School of Coaching & Mentoring.

On 7th March, women from different walks of life sat around to discuss how to get the best from mentoring as a mentor and a mentee. Natacha Wilson who has an impressive career and acts as a mentor with the Foundation for Women Entrepreneurs and the Cherie Blair foundation for Women led the very enlightening workshop for the evening. Participants discussed a variety of topics such as what successful mentoring looks like, the reasons mentoring may not last and how and when to find mentorship.

 Who should a mentee seek?

A mentee should firstly recognize that they could get mentoring when they need and not wait to face adversity before seeking help.

The workshop participants discussed what qualities and skill set look for in a mentor. First of all, they agreed that careers and similarity of background are quite important. Before starting the process, ensure that there is a rapport and trust with a potential mentor, who should have a behavioral awareness to be able to understand how other people may react to a situation. It is equally important for them to have a sense of humor and great communication skills. Ideally, the mentor should be committed to learning more about mentoring and help others manage self-care.

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Natacha Wilson

Who should a mentor seek?

A mentee who has clarity of go
als of what they would like out of their mentoring experience. An important tip from experienced mentors was to manage maximum two mentees, engage no longer than six months and get feedback halfway through the process.

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What preparation can be done for mentoring?

A mentee should prepare an agenda for every meeting and have SMART goals to have a definition of success in mentorship. They should decide which area of their life they would like to discuss and set ground rules of commitment. In a meeting, the conversation should be led by the mentee with clarity on what they would like out of the mentoring experience. A mentor, on the other hand, could ask mentees to prioritize tasks vs timelines, identify the blockers, agree how to give feedback in a particular format and decide on boundaries. An employee could negotiate with an employer to find time for mentorship.

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What could happen during the mentoring process?

It is important to recognize the moments where mentors find themselves getting too attached to a mentee’s progress, feeling like it is your responsibility to help achieve the goal of a mentee and do a lot more than required.  It is vital to managing that closure when the mentorship finishes.

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Natacha Wilson

 

Towards the end of the workshop, a 5-minute speed mentoring session was held giving participants a glimpse of what the experience could be like. The workshop ended on a very positive note, listing the many benefits of mentoring. Mentors can help spot opportunities, build confidence, give impartial feedback and show broader perspectives. Mentees benefit from being listened to without interruption, can get help assessing risks and inspiration and motivation in their life. Most importantly you recognize how your life experiences can help anyone in a huge way, so get out there and get mentoring!

Do you want to become a CamAWiSE member?

Becoming a member of CamAWiSE helps us organize more events like this one and help women on STEM reach their full potential.

Full Member (£30 a year) Student (£5 a year)

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Success: what lies behind the mask

Book now and share!

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Kate Atkin will be talking about the imposter syndrome the 26th of April.

Download the poster here. Learn more here

The Workshop will be held in the Reception Room at Lucy Cavendish College, Cambridge.

Wednesday 26th April. 8-10pm

Booking is now closed 

Book now! Last places remaining.

Confidence: the ultimate career ingredient

Book now for the 4th WiSE UP workshop. Confidence: the ultimate career ingredient facilitated by Tennie Videler. Last places remaining!

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The Workshop will be held in the Woodlegh Room at Lucy Cavendish College, Cambridge.

Tuesday 28th March. 8-10pm

 Book now closed.

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