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Relaunch your career November 4th

Are you looking to change careers but have no idea where to start?

Have you taken a career break and are looking for advice and support on how to re-enter the workforce?

Have you relocated because of your significant other and now find yourself unemployed?

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We have a special event just for. On November 4th 2017, at the British Antarctic Survey’s Aurora Center, we will be hosting ‘Relaunch Your Career’.

We aim to give you the tools, confidence and support system to take that first step. A full day of training for women with a background in Science, Technology, IT, Engineering, Maths, and Medicine, it will include expert speakers, workshops and plenty of networking opportunities.

We invite all women, regardless of your career stage, to take advantage of this incredible event.

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Aurora Centre

The morning will be devoted to talks from experts about identifying your skills, job flexibility, confidence, negotiation and more and the opportunity to ask questions and interact with the speakers.

Following a lunch break, we will have workshops to give you hands-on experience on creating an online presence, crafting your CV, finding your career anchors and more.

Finally, we have organised an inspirational woman in STEM career panel so you can hear from women who were in your situation and how they coped. Learn from their successes and failures and feel supported.

Schedule

From 9:00 Registration
Networking
9:30-9:45 Welcome BAS & CamAWiSE.
10: 00 First session From Label to able by Katherine Wiid

How to Shine When Returning to Work by Claire Button

11:00 Coffee break
11:30 Second session Job sharing in STEM by Sara Horsfall

Confidence and negotiation  by Christina Youell

12:30 Lunch break
14:30 Workshops Self-Promote Through Your CV – re-write your CV to kick-start your dream career: with Claire Button

Careers Anchors, identify your strengths & values with by Tennie Videler

Getting noticed on LinkedIn and online presence with Catherine Sorbara

15:30 Tea break
16:00 Panel and Q&A Chaired by Jenny Brookman.

Sarah Bearpark – Returner

Ruchi Chauhan – Relocated from the USA

Claire MacDonald – Former Attendee

Catherine Onley – Returner

Ruchi Sharma – Career changer

17:00 Networking 
18:00 End of conference

Booking is now closed!

November 4th 2017,  British Antarctic Survey’s Aurora Center

British Antarctic Survey’s Aurora Center

Coffee break, Tea break, Lunch, and materials included.

Members £35

Non-Members £45

Event + Membership  ££60

With the collaboration of

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Do you feel like an imposter? by Aldara B. Dios

“Whether you think you can or whether you think you can’t, you’re right”
Henry Ford

In front of a full and expectant room, Kate Atkin started her remarkable talk on 23rd April asking us the questions: “What do YOU want to know? What do YOU want me to answer?” that was the beginning of a great and interactive workshop about the impostor phenomenon; it’s not a syndrome – she quickly clarified – and what lies behind success.

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The audience had a lot of questions. Some of them were about how to recognise the phenomenon: What is it? Does it affect women more than men or older people than younger? Does it depend on culture or family?

Others tried to understand the phenomenon: Does it have advantages? How to avoid it? How to recognise it? we even had a sarcastic: Is it another feminist nonsense?

So, what is the imposter phenomenon? 

As Kate put it “It is an intense feeling of intellectual phoniness despite one´s success”. It happens to successful people, and although it was first detected in women in academia now men and women from all over the world experience it. People like Michelle Obama, Art Garfunkel or Robin Ince have suffered from it and some studies say that up to 70% of all professionals will or have suffered with it.

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The imposter phenomenon it is not about having doubts the first time we do something. It is about still doubting ourselves after having done something successfully several times.

How to control it?

First thing: not everything has to be perfect and we have to learn to fail. Recognise our own patterns, perhaps you think that you are successful because you’ve worked harder than other people, when in fact, you should acknowledge your our own skills and abilities. Understand that success comes from expertise and know-how.

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Do you feel like an imposter? Kate recommended focusing on your successes: Make a confidence wall with all the things you are proud of or start a success log. Take control of your thoughts, take note of the positive feedback and finally avoid the dreaded “Yes,… but”…

As always, Kate delivered an engaging and amusing talk, full of useful facts and very enjoyable.

Thank you all for coming, and thank you, Kate.

Tips to boost your confidence.

We got together to work on top tips on being confident. First, we considered what situations we might particularly need a confidence boost in and choose the following ones to brainstorm tips for :

IMG_4653.JPG• Getting your opinion heard (for example in meetings)
• In a new role
• After a knock to your confidence, such as a failure, redundancy etc.
• For networking events
• Negotiating a pay rise or other working conditions such as flexi-time

1. Prepare- In every situation, bring prepared was seen as a real confidence. It helps to have thought about the content of what you are going to say, what arguments to use for your pay rise or other negotiations (including your researching your “market value”, considering the other person’s likely point of view), the interests and backgrounds of people you are meeting and possible answers to likely and hard questions in a job interview. For networking events people thought it was helpful to prepare an opening gambit as well as an exit strategy. Preparation for meetings can include sending out “homework” for others in advance.

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2. Celebrate successes- When you are feeling nervous or under confident, remember the successes you have had in the past. Maybe keep reminders (such as thank you cards or emails) to hand to remind yourself.
3. Be assertive- Assertive as a way of interacting with people is not the same as aggressive, it is the mindset that you are okay and the other person is okay and you both deserve respect and boundaries. You give respect and expect it in return. It involves listening, asking questions and clarifying and looking for areas of agreement and mutual wins.

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4. Feel the fear and do it anyway- it is natural to feel nervous, especially if you’re venturing out of your comfort zone (which is a good thing to be doing, but is when you are most likely to need a dose of confidence)
5. Get a mentor – Talking things through with someone who has been there may be the best thing for your confidence and it would be worth finding a mentor. For a general lift in confidence, become someone’s mentor! It will make you realize how far you have come.
6. Learn from your mistakes- Don’t beat yourself up about mistakes, analyse what you’d do differently next time. Don’t try to blame them on someone else and you will feel more confident in similar situations.

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7. Don’t take things personally/ keep perspective
8. Fake it till you make it- the important part really is the second half of the sentence- you will make it and you will feel confident in doing something that is now quite new, so put on a smile and act confident until you feel it. However, don’t bluster or over compensate.
9. Keep busy- Doing what you are good at will boost you. Maybe you can engineer small wins.
10. Do someone a favour- Or compliment or even just smile at someone, they won’t be the only ones benefiting!

Tips for specific situations included: if someone won’t stop talking, make a change to the situation, even if it is just getting up yourself.
To regain your confidence after a bad situation, remember how you bounced back before, what you did to get over any previous disappointments.

Thank you, Tennie for a most effective workshop!

Getting noticed on LinkedIn

If you missed this workshop or love it and want to attend to an improved version book now for the Relaunch your career event. Read more here

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“I have attended events on LinkedIn before, but this workshop’s step-wise approach to building a meaningful and strong profile had much more impact”, said one attendee coming out of the CamAWiSE event. The ‘Getting noticed on LinkedIn’ workshop was conducted by Cathy Sorbara, COO of Cheeky Scientist and a steering group member of CamAWiSE. LinkedIn is proving to be a ‘must-have’ social presence for professional growth whether to seek job opportunities or to build your brand. 

Cathy asked the attendees to consider questions like –

  • What is the goal of your LinkedIn profile?
  • Who is your target audience (hiring manager or business partner?)
  • If someone doesn’t know your name, what keywords might they use which would lead them to your profile?

 

Cathy emphasised making use of the headline and summary space to create a crisp account of your achievements and aspirations. The headline, she explained, should use your transferable and technical skills to define you as a person. Make a connection with the viewer using an elevator pitch! The summary should not be a resumé–like account but an expression or narration of your aspirations. List the achievements that relate to those goals in a manner that stimulates the viewer to connect and find out more about you. Visual assets including PowerPoint presentations, links to blogs, pdf files, and pictures can be added to reinforce your achievements and the trajectory you aspire to.

img_4458-copyRecommendations and skills endorsements from connections (usually colleagues) are important ways to build credibility and increase profile views. Cathy added: “Everybody has transferable skills, even if they don’t know it, and these skills are in popular demand over technical ones”. Your profile photo must be high-quality and professional-looking, while a background photo is a great way to give further weight to the image you would like to promote. Volunteer experiences and publicising your interests by content sharing are great ways to connect to your target audience and showcase your communication and knowledge-based skills.

When requesting connections, it is more rewarding and respectful to personalise the standard message provided by LinkedIn. You can refer to a common interest or connection, for example, but keep to no more than 50 words.

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A great profile will help you begin to capitalise on the most powerful online networking tool in the world that is used by 98% of recruiters. However, networking on LinkedIn is the next essential step to connect directly with target viewers and their secondary connections, helping you build a strong network which enhances profile visibility. Other social media platforms like Twitter, as well as in-person networking, also play an important role. Let’s connect!

by Ruchi Chauhan

Book now! ‘Getting noticed on LinkedIn’

Don’t miss the second event of the WiSE UP workshops. ‘Getting noticed on LinkedIn’ facilitated by Cathy Sorbara will be held November 15th at Lucy Cavendish.

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LinkedIn has over 332 million users, 17 million in the UK alone.

94% of recruiters use LinkedIn to vet candidates. Keeping your LinkedIn profile up-to-date makes you 18 times more likely to be found in searches and by recruiters.

Bottom line: if your profile is not up to scratch, you are missing out on capitalizing on the most powerful online networking tool in the world.

Come join CamAWiSE as we walk you through the three most important components of a LinkedIn profile and how to successfully optimize your profile to increase visibility.

Whether you are changing careers or simply looking to build an online presence, this workshop is not to be missed.

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Book for :

Getting noticed on LinkedIn

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Getting noticed on LinkedIn

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