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Let’s Get Quizzical: A women in STEM Quiz night

Join us!
A fun and relaxed evening of networking for women in STEM. A superb opportunity to meet other women in academia, industry, and enterprise at different career stages.

For part of the evening, we will have a fun thematic quiz night. How much do you know about women in STEM? Are you ready to win our big prize or will you be the wooden spoon?

And of course, as every year we have a special summer treat: famous Lucy Cavendish’s mini scones and strawberries & cream.

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Lucy Cavendish College
Reception rooms
Tuesday 18th July
20:00-22:00

Lucy Cavendish College is a walking distance from the City Center
There is plenty of space for your bike and free parking for attendees.

Book here!

 

 

What Next for your Career in Science

The annual careers lunchtime talk on scientific careers, held in association with the MRC-LMB, will take place on Friday 30th June 12:00-14:00 in the Max Perutz Lecture Theatre. The presentations will be followed by a buffet lunch and networking opportunity.

Before the crowds

Topics to be covered include career transitions into the Biotech Industry, Business Development and Consultancy, and Public Engagement.

The speakers are:

Dr. Elizabeth Fairley
Elizabeth is currently the Director at Talking Medicines

Dr. Monika Papworth
Monika is at MedImmune (formerly Cambridge Antibody Technology)

Dr. Sarah Cumbers
Sarah works at NICE and is currently an Associate Director.

This event and lunch is free and open to all AWiSE members and others in
Cambridge.

Please register on Eventbrite

https://goo.gl/eM4Asu

Friday 30th June
12.00-2.00pm
Venue: Laboratory of Molecular Biology

Meet the Steering Group – Ruchi Chauhan

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I am a biotechnology scientist with 15 years of research experience in various fields, including Neuroscience, Cancer, Proteo-Gen(omics) etc. I did my Ph.D. research at the Boston Children’s Hospital / Harvard Medical School, USA. I worked as a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Merck Pharma, Boston, USA. Currently, I am a Research Scientist at the Department of Genetics at the University of Cambridge.

Developing the business potential of scientific innovations has been my passion. I have often led my research projects to reach their applied or therapeutic potential and to be used as a tool of innovation and commercialization for better productivity. In addition, I have worked as the Fellow of Commercialization at the Technology Transfer department of the Harvard University. I have co-founded a data-analysis company that is in early proof-of-concept phase.

I am serving in various leadership & management roles in esteemed STEM organizations engaging students, women professionals, and non-scientific public. To name a few, I am a STEM Ambassador (STEMNET), Deputy-Chair (CamAWiSE), Mentor (NYAS), Science Reviewer (AAAS), and in Communications team (Pint of Science). I am an active educator/communicator of science contributing to STEM education/outreach, especially for women.

Save the date: CamAWiSE-MRC Annual lunchtime

CamAWiSE-MRC Annual lunchtime meeting is on Friday 30th June

Before the crowds

What next for your career in science

Friday 30th June

12.00-2.00pm

Venue: Laboratory of Molecular Biology

Topics to be covered include career transitions into the Biotech Industry, Business Development and Consultancy, and Public Engagement.
The talks will be followed by a networking lunch, sponsored by the MRC.
Further details and Registration to follow.

 

 

Do you feel like an imposter? by Aldara B. Dios

“Whether you think you can or whether you think you can’t, you’re right”
Henry Ford

In front of a full and expectant room, Kate Atkin started her remarkable talk on 23rd April asking us the questions: “What do YOU want to know? What do YOU want me to answer?” that was the beginning of a great and interactive workshop about the impostor phenomenon; it’s not a syndrome – she quickly clarified – and what lies behind success.

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The audience had a lot of questions. Some of them were about how to recognise the phenomenon: What is it? Does it affect women more than men or older people than younger? Does it depend on culture or family?

Others tried to understand the phenomenon: Does it have advantages? How to avoid it? How to recognise it? we even had a sarcastic: Is it another feminist nonsense?

So, what is the imposter phenomenon? 

As Kate put it “It is an intense feeling of intellectual phoniness despite one´s success”. It happens to successful people, and although it was first detected in women in academia now men and women from all over the world experience it. People like Michelle Obama, Art Garfunkel or Robin Ince have suffered from it and some studies say that up to 70% of all professionals will or have suffered with it.

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The imposter phenomenon it is not about having doubts the first time we do something. It is about still doubting ourselves after having done something successfully several times.

How to control it?

First thing: not everything has to be perfect and we have to learn to fail. Recognise our own patterns, perhaps you think that you are successful because you’ve worked harder than other people, when in fact, you should acknowledge your our own skills and abilities. Understand that success comes from expertise and know-how.

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Do you feel like an imposter? Kate recommended focusing on your successes: Make a confidence wall with all the things you are proud of or start a success log. Take control of your thoughts, take note of the positive feedback and finally avoid the dreaded “Yes,… but”…

As always, Kate delivered an engaging and amusing talk, full of useful facts and very enjoyable.

Thank you all for coming, and thank you, Kate.

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