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Posts from the ‘Mentoring’ Category

Getting noticed on LinkedIn

“I have attended events on LinkedIn before, but this workshop’s step-wise approach to building a meaningful and strong profile had much more impact”, said one attendee coming out of the CamAWiSE event. The ‘Getting noticed on LinkedIn’ workshop was conducted by Cathy Sorbara, COO of Cheeky Scientist and a steering group member of CamAWiSE. LinkedIn is proving to be a ‘must-have’ social presence for professional growth whether to seek job opportunities or to build your brand. 

Cathy asked the attendees to consider questions like –

  • What is the goal of your LinkedIn profile?
  • Who is your target audience (hiring manager or business partner?)
  • If someone doesn’t know your name, what keywords might they use which would lead them to your profile?

 

Cathy emphasised making use of the headline and summary space to create a crisp account of your achievements and aspirations. The headline, she explained, should use your transferable and technical skills to define you as a person. Make a connection with the viewer using an elevator pitch! The summary should not be a resumé–like account but an expression or narration of your aspirations. List the achievements that relate to those goals in a manner that stimulates the viewer to connect and find out more about you. Visual assets including PowerPoint presentations, links to blogs, pdf files, and pictures can be added to reinforce your achievements and the trajectory you aspire to.

img_4458-copyRecommendations and skills endorsements from connections (usually colleagues) are important ways to build credibility and increase profile views. Cathy added: “Everybody has transferable skills, even if they don’t know it, and these skills are in popular demand over technical ones”. Your profile photo must be high-quality and professional-looking, while a background photo is a great way to give further weight to the image you would like to promote. Volunteer experiences and publicising your interests by content sharing are great ways to connect to your target audience and showcase your communication and knowledge-based skills.

When requesting connections, it is more rewarding and respectful to personalise the standard message provided by LinkedIn. You can refer to a common interest or connection, for example, but keep to no more than 50 words.

getting-noticed

A great profile will help you begin to capitalise on the most powerful online networking tool in the world that is used by 98% of recruiters. However, networking on LinkedIn is the next essential step to connect directly with target viewers and their secondary connections, helping you build a strong network which enhances profile visibility. Other social media platforms like Twitter, as well as in-person networking, also play an important role. Let’s connect!

by Ruchi Chauhan

To tweet or not to tweet

By Tennie Videler

I missed the last WiSE Up workshop but know online presence was part of it.

Here is my take on using twitter, which I use in a pretty low level way for my job. I’ve not used twitter to find out what celebrities have for breakfast but rather for finding out what is happening in my work sphere, build a presence and ask questions. I really think you need to start using it to find it useful….. Key is finding the right people to ‘follow’, by searching, for example using hashtags (#word). Once you’ve found a group of people to follow, look at who they follow too. Some people make recommendations, especially on Fridays (follow Friday or FF in twitter speak). These days twitter recommends people for you to follow too based on your searches and ‘tweets’.

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Does the way scientists think lend itself to entrepreneurialism?

Cambridge is famous for its many innovators, some of whom have gone on to be very, very successful in the business world.

What kind of mind do you need to be a successful business person? Clever, innovative and resourceful all help. Visionary, maybe? Process-oriented? Organised? With plenty of the “soft” or people skills?

It’s a rare bird who combines all of these so no need to despair if you think you’re missing some. We can all benefit from adopting a different type of thinking.

For example, you might think that, if being a woman in science or engineering isn’t as rewarding as you’d hoped, you’d like to try something else and maybe being your own boss has an attractive sound. Do you then immediately think “Well, what could I do – I don’t have any ideas.”?

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Do you have a “sod all” box?

A meeting report for the Peer Mentoring Workshop…

Most of the Cambridge AWiSE AGM was devoted to a workshop on peer mentoring. We defined peer mentoring as providing mentoring in a group of peers. In such a group everyone mentors each other.

We brainstormed rules for our peer mentoring session and came up with the following:
• Professionalism and respect to each other and regarding others
• Listening to what each has to say as well as talk, giving each roughly equal airtime
• One conversation at a time
• Conversations should be cooperative, constructive and solution focused
• Conversations should be challenging rather than pedestrian
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Peer Mentoring Workshop and CamAWiSE AGM

After the success of last year’s format, we will again feature a workshop on peer mentoring at the Cambridge AWiSE AGM on Tuesday 21st February.

Peer mentoring is the idea of providing mentoring in a group of peers. In such a group everyone mentors each other. It works on the assumption that we all gain different experiences and in a group of committed and intelligent women there will be useful experiences relating to your current situation.

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