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Posts from the ‘Computer science and IT’ Category

March 7th -How to get the best from mentoring as a mentor and a mentee

The booking for the 3rd Wise-up workshop is now open. Learn how to get the best from mentoring: as a mentor and mentee. Mentoring is a rewarding experience which allows the sharing of knowledge and skills to help individuals gain confidence, develop ideas, fine tune value propositions, get funding or secure a pilot.

Natacha is a Mentor with the Foundation for Women Entrepreneurs, Cherie Blair Foundation for Women, an organization which supports women entrepreneurs around the world. The Foundation provides support in business skills, technology, networks and access to capital so that women can build their capability, confidence, and capital necessary to establish and grow their businesses and create employment opportunities. She was a Mentor for the Accelerator Programme at the University of Cambridge Judge Business School.

porster2Natacha is a Lecturer and Fellow at the Cambridge Marketing College, Director of a leadership and development programme for CEOs of charities and social enterprises Ella Forums, and until recently, Advisor to Cambridge’s E-Luminate Festival.

The Workshop will be held in the Woodlegh Room at Lucy Cavendish College, Cambridge.

The booking for the 4th WiSE UP workshop ‘Confidence: the ultimate career ingredient‘ is also open. Book for both at a reduced price.

Tuesday 7th March. 8-10pm

 Booking is now closed

Book now! ‘Career anchors: identify your strengths & values’

Don’t miss the first event of the new CAMAWiSE season. Booking for ‘Career anchors: identify your strengths & values’ is now open to all.

wise-up-oct2016

 

Learn more and book here.

 

Sue Black: making change happen

On November 14th,  a good crowd of AWiSE and Lucy Cavendish members were entertained by Sue Black talking about her life and many achievements.  She is a wonderful example of how you can bring about change, not just in your own life, but for the benefit of others too.

Finding herself a single mum with three under-fives living in Tower Hamlets, she decided that she needed to get a qualification to provide an income for her family.  She started by doing a Maths access course where she was one of only two women, who came joint top of the class.  She followed this with a computing degree at the University of the South Bank – chosen as the nearest place to home so she could juggle childcare.  When she was asked to continue to PhD level, she admits she did not know what a PhD was.  She then followed an academic career in computing, becoming Head of Information and Software Systems at the University of Westminster.

Sue’s first step into making a difference was to set up BCSWomen, which she did to provide a forum for women in IT, who were often the only women in their department or at a conference, to interact and support each other.  On a visit to Bletchley Park, Sue was surprised to learn that over half of the war-time staff had been women.  So she started an oral history project to tell their story. Read more

It is Ada Lovelace Day!

Ada Lovelace wasn’t just the first female computer programmer, she was the world’s first ever computer programmer full stop. Ada Lovelace day celebrates women in STEM, which is also what Cambridge AWiSE is all about! There is lots of activity on twitter on the fact it is Ada Lovelace day, I even noticed it ‘trending’.  Here are some of the links that caught my attention….

Plenty of posts with background on who Ada Lovelace was, but this one is my favourite.  To get to know her in her own words, New Scientist have managed to secure a rare interview with her…. (well, they mined her correspondence very cleverly)

Even the BBC is promoting the occasion! The BBC has devoted front page coverage on its website to these profiles of female scientists.

The Guardian also has a lower profile, but very thoughtful piece focusing on ‘ women who have excelled in their field but have often been denied both opportunity and recognition’.

The Wellcome Trust publishes a blog  by Professor Dame Kay Davies and Sir Mark Walport on the need for flexibility in research careers, which is right up my street.

Ed Yong, a (male, as it happens) science blogger I very much admire compiled an all-female list of top science writers. My favourite, Jenny Rohn appears to be missing. Yours?

Trawling through twitter in search of Ada made me find out about the Double X science blog for women, which although very American, I shall be frequenting from now on.

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