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Posts from the ‘Physical Sciences’ Category

A journey to the Sun

by Aldara B. Dios

During this year’s AGM we were fortunate enough to have Dr. Helen Mason OBE as the speaker. She took us on a journey, not to the Sun perhaps, but through her life and research.

The Sun

She began talking about the Sun. The Sun is a middle-aged star that has fascinated scientists of all ages like Galileo and Newton, two of her favourite scientists, and still fascinates Helen Mason. The focus of her research is the Sun’s Corona, the aura of plasma that surrounds the Sun and which is only visible during an Eclipse. Although the Sun’s temperature is about six thousand Kelvin, the Corona’s temperature raises to an amazing millions of Kelvin degrees. And it is from the corona that the solar winds and storms originate which only add interest to its research.

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Full-Sun SOHO-EIT ultraviolet movie

Nobody is an island

But the Sun was only an introduction, she wished to share with us her path, and in her own words “Nobody is an island”. It’s true, no one creates a career alone. Your network (your family, your friends, your colleagues)  through the years is as important as your work. Helen shared with us how her friends and colleagues not only help her, but also make her feel very fortunate.

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While Helen was doing her Ph.D. at the University of London she found her first professional support: Professor Mike Seaton. He not only trusted her but he boosted her confidence as well, encouraging her to go beyond her comfort zone.

Mike Seaton with Alan Burgess at DAMTP

Years later, working in the USA, Helen was able to call upon her family’s help. By then she had two children and with both she and her husband working, her only support was that from sisters, which allowed her to continue researching.

It was hard, she said, but again I was fortunate, very fortunate to have my sisters. 

Back in the UK, she started working at the DAMTP (Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge) where the confidence and support of Professor David Crighton allowed her not only to continue working, but to expand in her career.

I’m in debt of this man

During her career, she has collaborated with NASA, ESA, SOHO (solar and heliospheric observatory), HINODE and CHIANTI, making her network bigger and giving her opportunities to visit astonishing places.

 

From left to right: Giulio Del-Zanna – Peter Young – Ken Dere – Massimo Landini – Enrico Landi – Helen Mason

 

You cannot teach a man anything, you can only help him discover it himself.

Help and networks go both ways, it’s a two-way road. Helen has been fortunate enough to be the support and inspiration not only of her Ph.D. students but also of hundreds of students in schools in Africa and the UK.

She confessed that her experience in India and South Africa, was a learning experience for the children and also for herself and the young teachers that accompanied her.

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The children had thirst for learning, they valued the opportunity to absorb new knowledge, new skills. Something that is taken for granted in Occident. 

Her advice

Helen has been fortunate (she said so several times during her talk) in her path with personal learning along the way. To end her talk she shared with us her magic list to achieve a successful life ourselves.

  • Be yourself
  • Be true to what matters in your life
  • In success remember those who helped you
  • Treat failure as an opportunity to learn and move forward
  • Never be afraid of a new challenge
  • Engage in other activities

 

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Ruchi Chauhan

 

We want to thank Dr. Helen Mason for an inspirational night and Ruchi Chauhan for inviting such a motivational speaker.

 

 

 

 

Dr Helen Mason OBE | A life in the Sun: supporting each other on our journey

The Sun, our star, is responsible for life on Earth, giving light, heat, and energy.

The lifetime work of internationally renowned scientist Helen Mason focuses on understanding the Sun, in particular, the solar atmosphere – the crown of light seen during a total eclipse (corona).

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Helen was awarded the “Women of Outstanding Achievement of 2010” in SET (Science, Engineering, and Technology). Her dedication to promoting SET on numerous platforms was recognised in her OBE (2014) for services to Higher Education and to Women in SET. Through her work, she teamed up with astronaut Tim Peake (International Space Station), creating activities for schools in the Space to Earth Challenge. Her online resource for teachers and students, Sun|trek is extensively used globally. She has taken her outreach work across India and South Africa.

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Come spend a special evening with Helen Mason. Listen to her rich journey, the successes, the challenges and the critical support from others in her life and career.

A short AGM will follow.

“We each have a dream, we each have a passion, and I have enjoyed a wonderful life in the Sun,”

Helen Mason OBE

Tuesday 6th February 2018, 8:00-10:00pm

Reception rooms

Lucy Cavendish College, Cambridge

Refreshments include cake, tea, and coffee.

Booking is now closed. 

 

S.U.R.F. your way to a new career

… By Katherine Wiid of Recrion & Career Ambitions, specialist in Career Management, Recruitment and Retention.

Earlier this month, Katherine Wiid opened our CamAW1SE Conference with an intriguing talk titled ‘From Label to Able’. And rather than leaving delegates drowning in information, they discovered a new approach to their careers and job search that would leave them riding high on the choppy waves of the job market…

 

S.U.R.F. your way to a new career…

Do you at times have doubts about whether your skills, experiences and qualifications are relevant for the local job market?

Often when I meet a client for career coaching for the first time, they say things like, “I’m a C++ programmer but I haven’t got all the latest languages like Rust and Swift, so I’m not getting any interviews.”

And there’s the problem. They’ve been caught in the label trap – seeing themselves as a set of skills on a job description. Candidates often see their applications getting rejected, with no feedback to help them improve their applications. Often candidates tell me it’s as if their CVs are going into a machine that strips their carefully crafted experience and skills into a series of ticks and crosses, translating to ‘not a good match’.

But we are all much more than a list of skills. We just need to look beyond the check list, see past the labels and identify what we have to offer a potential employer beyond their job description.

Learn to S.U.R.F.

What does surfing have to do with your job search? To change careers, start afresh and tackle the choppy job market, we need to have a balanced approach so that we can ride the rough with the smooth…

S = Skills
If you ask yourself “what do you do?” you’ll probably instinctively answer with a label. But is that all you are? Can you not be something else also?

Labels narrow down our options. Don’t assume that your qualifications speak for themselves. I see too many career professionals with impressive qualifications who fail to see what those skills actually enable them to do, beyond the label.

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Ask yourself:
• What did I learn that has added to my skill set?
• How does the experience allow me to offer something different in a market flooded with qualified people?
• How do I use or hope to use this qualification?

To master the art of S.U.R.F.ing we need to be skillful at identifying our skills. One of the main reasons that people aren’t motivated in their careers is because they only see half the skills they have. They only really develop and use a quarter of those skills, and they only put a fraction of them on their CVs! No wonder those CV machines are coming back as ‘not a good match’…

To uncover your hidden skills and talents, think about and write down:
• The activities you enjoyed at school / university / in your spare time. Everything we read and learn about in our own time – not just when studying – gives us new skills
• Think about how you do what you do. From day to day how do you manage your home, family, work, social life? You might be a great organiser or the person who comes up with the ideas!

It’s not what you’ve got, it’s what you do with what you’ve got!

U = Unconscious

How many of your skills are unconscious, undeveloped, undiscovered? Knowing yourself and what drives you at a deeper unconscious level is one of the most attractive qualities in a candidate.

If we aren’t consciously aware of what motivates us we can end up working in an environment where we are not challenged or passionate about we do. This can knock our confidence and lead to a wasted, unfulfilled life.

To help you become more consciously aware of your unconscious motivations here are three questions to ask yourself:
• What’s important to me and has to be in my work?
• What gives me the greatest buzz at work
• If all jobs paid the same what would I do?

Remember, it’s not what you’ve got, it’s what you do with what you’ve got!

R = Relevant

As you are learning to S.U.R.F. you will become skillful at assessing your skills and tapping into what unconsciously motivates you. Now it’s time to make these new discoveries relevant to the job market. How can your unique skills, experiences and passions be of use to the hundreds of companies seeking new talent? How can you help them to choose you?

To do this, we’ll need to step into the shoes of the employer. If you see a job you like the look of, but they’re asking for a skill you don’t obviously have, don’t reject it. Employers aren’t always able to articulate exactly what they want and job descriptions aren’t always accurate. Ask yourself, why do they need this? What problem will it solve?

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Try doing a SWOT analysis, which will help you to understand the context of the job within the company and within that market. What are their strengths and weaknesses? What are the external opportunities and threats for the organization? Now do the same exercise on yourself. What are the strengths you have that might minimize their weaknesses and threats? What have you got that will enable them to take advantage of an opportunity.

Now tailor your CV and cover letter to address what might be going through their minds when they are assessing you. This will set you apart as you are answering the problem posed by the job, showing them how skillful you are without necessarily having the exact skill they thought they needed!

Remember, it’s not what you’ve got, it’s what you do with what you’ve got!

F = Flexible

To be able to S.U.R.F. well, you need to be flexible and see yourself and the job market with fresh eyes.

For you, that might mean experimenting with new career ideas, trialing new roles and being prepared to make mistakes. Ensure your mistakes are positive steps in your learning.

Flexibility for you might not be sitting and waiting for that career opportunity to come knocking, but to increase the odds in your favour by learning to think openly, being curious, asking decision makers for 30 minutes of their time to give you an insight into what they do. Be alert to the possibility that your skills and motivations might be suited to a job that didn’t even exist.

Remember, it’s not what you’ve got, it’s what you do with what’s you got!

Effective S.U.R.F.ing is about finding a career that works for you, matching what you’ve got and who you are with the life you are going to lead.

Believe me, there are jobs hiding behind every wave, you just have to get up and S.U.R.F. them! Enjoy the ride…

Men as champions of change with Jill Armstrong

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Collaborating with Men is ground-breaking research conducted by Murray Edwards College with men to establish how men and women can work together to transform workplace culture barriers to women’s progress into leadership positions. Much research shows how women’s careers are ill-affected by assumptions and behaviour in the workplace that arise from the dominance of masculine culture. Yet, very little research has sought the point of view of men. The research asks men who support gender equality: Do they see the problems women report? What they can personally do to help change the workplace? What support do they need from leaders?

Read more about Jill Armstrong and her research.

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10th October.

20:00-22:00

Lucy Cavendish College

Reception rooms

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Booking is now closed


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Relaunch your career November 4th

Are you looking to change careers but have no idea where to start?

Have you taken a career break and are looking for advice and support on how to re-enter the workforce?

Have you relocated because of your significant other and now find yourself unemployed?

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We have a special event just for. On November 4th 2017, at the British Antarctic Survey’s Aurora Center, we will be hosting ‘Relaunch Your Career’.

We aim to give you the tools, confidence and support system to take that first step. A full day of training for women with a background in Science, Technology, IT, Engineering, Maths, and Medicine, it will include expert speakers, workshops and plenty of networking opportunities.

We invite all women, regardless of your career stage, to take advantage of this incredible event.

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Aurora Centre

The morning will be devoted to talks from experts about identifying your skills, job flexibility, confidence, negotiation and more and the opportunity to ask questions and interact with the speakers.

Following a lunch break, we will have workshops to give you hands-on experience on creating an online presence, crafting your CV, finding your career anchors and more.

Finally, we have organised an inspirational woman in STEM career panel so you can hear from women who were in your situation and how they coped. Learn from their successes and failures and feel supported.

Schedule

From 9:00 Registration
Networking
9:30-9:45 Welcome BAS & CamAWiSE.
10: 00 First session From Label to able by Katherine Wiid

How to Shine When Returning to Work by Claire Button

11:00 Coffee break
11:30 Second session Job sharing in STEM by Sara Horsfall

Confidence and negotiation  by Christina Youell

12:30 Lunch break
14:30 Workshops Self-Promote Through Your CV – re-write your CV to kick-start your dream career: with Claire Button

Careers Anchors, identify your strengths & values with by Tennie Videler

Getting noticed on LinkedIn and online presence with Catherine Sorbara

15:30 Tea break
16:00 Panel and Q&A Chaired by Jenny Brookman.

Sarah Bearpark – Returner

Ruchi Chauhan – Relocated from the USA

Claire MacDonald – Former Attendee

Catherine Onley – Returner

Ruchi Sharma – Career changer

17:00 Networking 
18:00 End of conference

Booking is now closed!

November 4th 2017,  British Antarctic Survey’s Aurora Center

British Antarctic Survey’s Aurora Center

Coffee break, Tea break, Lunch, and materials included.

Members £35

Non-Members £45

Event + Membership  ££60

With the collaboration of

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